Syllabus for Physics 230.02:  Physics II,

Spring 2017, Lecture: TTh 12:35-1:50PM, SCI 210

Instructor: Dr. Weining Man            Office: SCI 386                           phone:  415-338-2731              Email: weining@sfsu.edu

Help sessions: (T 3-4 PM, T-O 4)                                    Office Hours:  T4-5 PM  SCI 386    

Welcome to Phys 230, Physics II: E & M.

PHYS 232: This course must be taken concurrently with PHYS 232 (unless you already got C or better for PHYS 232), a separate 1- unit lab class taught by a different instructor, who assigns you a separate grade PHYS 232 starts to meet during the second week of class. Students not enrolled in lecture will be dropped from the lab by the second week, and vice versa.

 

Text:  Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Technology Update, 9th Edition, by Raymond A. Serway  & John W. Jewett

ISBN-13: 978-1305116399.  The book store offers a LOOSE-LEAF version of the ENTIRE book bundled with MULTI-TERM WebAssign (Life of Edition) package (students pay one price for WebAssign access for ALL 3 semesters of the sequence, including access to the e-book).  Students who do not want the loose-leaf or only want one term access can purchase online a digital-only package directly through WebAssign.

 

We do “flip-the-classroom” for this course. It is crucial that you finish the assigned reading before EACH lecture. Otherwise the classes will be too hard to follow. Quiz based on assigned reading will be given. During the class, we will focus on deeper problem solving and active engagement, instead of traditional lecturing. You will benefit greatly from active participation in reading, discussing, reasoning and practicing before and during the lectures.

 

Everything other than the textbook is posted on ilearn. (Lecture notes used in class, summary of each chapter, worksheet solutions, homework solutions, equation sheet, review notes, etc.) Remember to read the lecture notes and chapter summary, before doing homework and study the posted homework solutions after the due date, to get ready for quizzes.

 

Class attendances: Attendance and participation in classroom activities are extremely important. Bring your calculator to class. Be on time for class. Unannounced quizzes based on homework or reading assignments can be given. We focus on understanding concepts, equations, applications and “why” in the lectures. Keep your mind active. It’s impossible to learn physics by memorizing facts and following steps to plug numbers into equations. To understand is the most crucial thing.  Please do not use cell-phone, make noise, walk in-out, or do other things to disturb lectures. You will need an iclicker remote for the lectures.

 

Homework: There will be a homework assignment due before each lecture, two to three times a week. These will be entirely on the WebAssign system. Once HW due date passes, the system will not accept answers.  No HW extensions. To do homework actively is the most effective step to learn physics. It is very important! Group study is encouraged. Attempt homework questions on your own referring to your book and notes before working with a group. Come to office hours. Make sure to work out your own problems independently after discussing with your friends or tutors. If you get fish (the homework solutions) without really learn fishing (to solve similar problem alone), you will do poorly in quizzes and exams. 

After the first lecture, you will be able to login at https://www.webassign.net/  

Username:                            lastname****                                     

Institution:                           sfsu                        

Initial Password:                 ****                        ,where **** is your last 4 digits of SFSU id.

For example: Tom Jones with last 4 digits of SFSU id of 1234 will have username: jones1234 and initial pw: 1234

Update your active address in your webassign account, so that you will receive future announcements about exams on time. Webassign is free for you during the first 2 weeks of class, start NOW. There are different choices of loose leaf textbook, e-book, with one semester or multi-semester of webassign access.

All exam and quiz problems are from the SAME homework problems or problems we go over in class.

 

Help Session: If you find HW not easy, make sure that you attend weekly help session, where I will work through calculation problems step by step and help you with homework. Every week, there are about 10 help sessions offered by me and PHYS 232 instructors to help you with PHYS 230 homework. You are welcome to attend any help sessions, especially mine. Please sign up for SCI 234 (F 9:10-10:25 T-P3), if you need more problem solving guide and homework help.

 

Exams:  2 midterms and a comprehensive final. There will be many homework based problem solving quizzes and reading quizzes. Missing exam will receive zero point, unless previously discussed.

 

Academic dishonesty: Students are expected to perform their own work on all assignments in the course. Dishonesty on an exam, quiz, or homework will result in a grade of zero for that assignment, or even a failing grade for the course.

 

Grading: The final score will be based on the homework and exam scores as indicated below:

Final Exam 30%                 Midterms 40% (20% each)        Quizzes and clickers (drop 1)  15%                  Homework (drop  2)   15%

Final letter (+/-) grade:           90 and up :  A,           75 and up : B;                     60 and up:  C;                      50 and up : D.

I will not curve. I do give bonus points for your real effort. I wish everyone to do very well and get B or better (75 out of 100 or better). I do not limit the number of As. Extra bonus points can be given to students who finish bonus assignments actively. If you get less than 60 out of 100 as your overall score, I will not be able to give you a C.

 

Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in both PHYS 220 and MATH 227. Students who have not completed equivalent courses with a grade of C or higher in each will be dropped from PHYS 230 and PHYS 232. Students will be held accountable for all the physics concepts and basic equations from PHYS 220, as well as literally all math classes leading up to MATH 228 including high school math.

 

Checklist of what you should do: (12-15 hours a week is expected outside of the classroom.)

·         Read the text before each lecture, otherwise lectures will definitely be too quick and too hard to follow.

·         Understand all concepts, equations and “why” in lectures. You will get lost if you just memorize facts or plug numbers.

·         Actively derive equations and do the Math during lectures.  To copy the whiteboard will not help.

·         Don’t miss class. To make-up 1 lecture takes 3 times of hours.  Carefully review my notes after an unavoidable absence.

·         Study in groups and help each other, but do not simply give or ask for answers.

·         Finish HW independently after discussions. Make sure that you understand everything by yourself. Mark those hard ones.

·         Request keys on Webassign. Review posted HW solutions. Redo all the hard ones before quizzes and exams.

·         Go to at least one help session every week. PHYS 230 lectures are not enough for showing many step by step examples.

·         Improve your math skills. Otherwise, you will have a hard time dealing with the vector fields and integrations.  

·         Keep up with the materials as it is covered. New sessions build on the previous. I’s really hard to catch up once fall behind.

Please fill the blanks with reserved time slots for PHYS 230. (A good sample is suggested below)

Reading text before lectures: (1-2hr each, 3+ times per week) 

                        _ Su 9-10PM______________        _M 9-10PM__________________           __W 9-11PM______________

Review Lecture notes :  (0.5-1 hr each time, 2+ times per week)              

                        _ T 7-7:30PM_____________       _Th 7-7:30 PM__________________             

Do HW:  (1-4hrs, attempt HW 3+ times a week)

                        _T 7:30-10 PM  _____________    _Th 7:30--9PM________________         __Sa 3-6PM________________

Review HW solutions:(0.5-2 hrs)              

Sun 8-9 PM  (be ready for quiz)________       _Redo hard HW questions on weekends

Attend SCI 234, help sessions, or office hours

(Bring all questions and have them answered right away. Do not wait till falling behind.):   T 3-4PM  ________________                    

How to make homework easier:

·         Start to attempt HW as early as possible. To finish before the due date, allow 2-4 days (4-8 hours total) for reviewing, practicing, and reading new chapters. It’s impossible to finish HW the night before due date.  The number of allowed attempts on calculation problems is 7. HW finished 24 hours before the due date will get bonus credits.

·         Review the text, chapter summary, lecture notes, and problem-solving steps on notes and textbooks..

·         Understand your questions before plugging numbers into equations.

·         Start the problem by drawing a diagram.  Explain your solution in words.

·         If homework looks hard, first try to solve the sample problems on the book and lecture notes without peeking.

·         Pay attention to units. Check results and order of magnitude to make sure they are reasonable. Pay attention to round-off error.

·         Get help--but only after trying the problems yourself. Discussions are allowed and encouraged. But NEVER cheat! Offering or asking homework answers completely destroy the precious learning opportunities.

Make sure that you sign up for the one unit SCI 234 and attend at least one help session per week, if you need problem solving guide and homework help. Don’t count on the very limited lecture hours for HW help.

 

* Students with medical conditions or learning disabilities who need reasonable accommodations are encouraged to contact me for necessary arrangements. The DPRC is available to facilitate the process (dprc@sfsu.edu)

 

Please keep an eye on your webassign announcements and sfsu email accounts for announcements.

Please keep in touch and let me know how you are doing and how I can help. I am looking forward to a fun and successful semester.                 Let’s start the journey to the fun Physics world of E and M. Enjoy!                                                                           

 (Last updated Aug-24 2016)

Course Objectives:

1. Understand the connections between Coulomb's Law and the law of universal gravitation, and be able to calculate the paths of charged particles in electric and magnetic fields.

2. Know that electric charges and time-varying magnetic fields are the sources of electric fields and be able to calculate electric fields for spherically, cylindrically, and planar symmetric charge distributions.

3. Know that currents, moving charges, and time-varying electric fields are the sources of magnetic fields and be able to calculate magnetic fields for cylindrically and planar symmetric current distributions.

4. Apply Maxwell's equations in their integral form and general vector calculus techniques using Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinate systems.

5. Know that electric and magnetic fields store energy and be able to calculate this energy for symmetric fields.

6. Analyze AC and DC circuits constructed from batteries, resistors, capacitors and inductors, and be able to calculate the current through and voltage across all components as a function of time.

7. Know that, in classical electromagnetism, light is an electromagnetic wave emitted by accelerated charges which transports energy and momentum.

 

Student Learning Outcomes for Lower Division Physical Science (B1):  See http://physics.sfsu.edu/~wman/230/

1. Explain the steps in the scientific method of inquiry, which involves gathering observable, empirical and measurable evidence subject to specific principles of reasoning, and recognizing that reproducible observation of a result is necessary for a theory to be accepted as valid by the scientific community;

2. Analyze specific examples of how the scientific method has been used in the past to collect data through observation and experimentation, and to formulate, test and reformulate hypotheses about the physical universe; evaluate scientific information from a variety of sources and use that information to articulate well-reasoned responses to scientific concerns;

3. Evaluate scientific information from a variety of sources and use that information to articulate well-reasoned responses to scientific concerns;

4. Recognize the utility of alternative scientific hypotheses in the development of scientific theories, research and applications and understand how scientific evidence is used to develop hypotheses and theories;

5. Describe ethical dilemmas arising out of contemporary scientific research and applications, which may include those related to social justice, and may have implications for local and/or global communities;

6. Use scientific theories to explain phenomena observed in laboratory or field settings; and

7. Discuss the relevance of major scientific theories and research to their lives.

 

Plagiarism: http://www.physics.sfsu.edu/policy/plagiarism.pdf

This is one of the classes that are “impacted” (more students wish to enroll than the spaces available). Withdrawal will be permitted only if documentation of the “serious and compelling” reasons is provided.  When deciding whether to withdraw from a class, please note that university policy allows you to take the class only one more time.

Friday, February 10, 2017 – Student ADD/DROP deadline (3RD week)    

Friday, March 17, 2017 – CR/NC deadline. (8th week).    
Monday, April 24, 2017 – Withdrawal deadline (serious/compelling). (4th through 12th week)

Tuesday, April 25, 2017– Withdrawal (serious/compelling + documentation). (week 13-15).   
Tuesday, May 16, 2017– Last day of class   
Final exam: Tue. May 23, 10:45-1:15

 

Week

 

 

 

 

Required

W1

23.1 Properties of Electric Charges 642

 

 

 

Required

W1

23.2 Charging Objects by Induction 644

 

 

 

Required

W1

23.3 Coulomb’s Law 645

 

 

 

Required

W2

23.4 The Electric Field 651

 

 

 

Required

W2

23.5 Electric Field of a Continuous Charge Distribution 654

 

 

 

Required

W2

23.6 Electric Field Lines 659

 

 

 

Required

W3

24.1 Electric Flux 673

 

 

 

Required

W3

24.2 Gauss’s Law 676

 

 

 

Required

W4

24.3 Application of Gauss’s Law to Various Charge Distributions 678

 

 

 

Required

W4

24.4 Conductors in Electrostatic Equilibrium 682

 

 

 

Required

W5

25.1 Electric Potential and Potential Difference 692

 

 

 

Required

W5

25.2 Potential Difference in a Uniform Electric Field 694

 

 

 

Required

W5

25.3 Electric Potential and Potential Energy Due to Point Charges 697

 

 

 

Required

W5

25.4 Obtaining the Value of the Electric Field from the Electric Potential 701

 

 

 

Required

W6

25.5 Electric Potential Due to Continuous Charge Distributions 703

 

 

 

Required

W6

25.6 Electric Potential Due to a Charged Conductor 707

 

 

 

Required

W13

26.1 Definition of Capacitance 722

 

 

 

Required

W13

26.2 Calculating Capacitance 724

 

 

 

Required

W13

26.3 Combinations of Capacitors 727

 

 

 

Required

W13

26.4 Energy Stored in a Charged Capacitor 731

 

 

 

Required

W13

26.5 Capacitors with Dielectrics 735

 

 

 

Required

W7

27.1 Electric Current 752

 

 

 

Required

W7

27.2 Resistance 756

 

 

 

Required

W7

27.6 Electrical Power 763

 

 

 

 

W8

23-27Midterm

 

 

 

Required

W8

28.1 Electromotive Force 775

 

 

 

Required

W8

28.2 Resistors in Series and Parallel 778

 

 

 

Required

W8

28.3 Kirchhoff’s Rules 785

 

 

 

Required

W14

28.4 RC Circuits 788

 

 

 

Required

W8

28.5 Electrical Meters 794

 

 

 

Required

W9

29.1 Magnetic Fields and Forces 809

 

 

 

Required

W9

29.2 Motion of a Charged Particle in a Uniform Magnetic Field 813

 

 

 

Required

W9

29.4 Magnetic Force Acting on a Current-Carrying Conductor 819

 

 

 

Required

W9

29.5 Torque on a Current Loop in a Uniform Magnetic Field 821

 

 

 

Required

W10

30.1 The Biot–Savart Law 837

 

 

 

Required

W10

30.3 Ampère’s Law 844

 

 

 

Required

W10

30.4 The Magnetic Field of a Solenoid 848

 

 

 

Required

W11

30.5 Gauss’s Law in Magnetism 850

 

 

 

Required

W11

30.6 Magnetism in Matter 852

 

 

 

Required

W11

31.1 Faraday’s Law of Induction 867

 

 

 

Required

W11

31.2 Motional emf 871

 

 

 

Required

W11

31.3 Lenz’s Law 876

 

 

 

Required

W12

31.4 Induced emf and Electric Fields 878

 

 

 

Required

W12

31.5 Generators and Motors 880

 

 

 

 

W12

Midterm2

 

 

 

Required

W14

32.1 Self-Induction and Inductance 897

 

 

 

Required

W14

32.2 RL Circuits 900

 

 

 

Required

W14

32.3 Energy in a Magnetic Field 903

 

 

 

Required

W15

32.5 Oscillations in an LC Circuit 907

 

 

 

Required

W15

32.6 The RLC Circuit 911

 

 

 

Required

W15

33.1 AC Sources 923

 

 

 

Required

W15

33.2 Resistors in an AC Circuit 924

 

 

 

Required

W15

33.3 Inductors in an AC Circuit 927

 

 

 

Required

W15

33.4 Capacitors in an AC Circuit 929

 

 

 

Required

W15

34.1 Displacement Current and the General Form of Ampère’s Law 953

 

 

 

Required

W15

34.2 Maxwell’s Equations and Hertz’s Discoveries 955

 

 

 

Required

W16

34.3 Plane Electromagnetic Waves 957

 

 

 

Required

W16

34.7 The Spectrum of Electromagnetic Waves 966

 

 

 

Optional

 

23.7 Motion of a Charged Particle in a Uniform Electric Field 661

 

 

 

Optional

 

25.8 Applications of Electrostatics 710

 

 

 

Optional

 

26.6 Electric Dipole in an Electric Field 738

 

 

 

Optional

 

27.3 A Model for Electrical Conduction 760

 

 

 

Optional

 

27.4 Resistance and Temperature 762

 

 

 

Optional

 

28.6 Household Wiring and Electrical Safety 796

 

 

 

Optional

 

29.3 Applications Involving Charged Particles Moving in a Magnetic Field 816

 

 

 

Optional

 

30.2 The Magnetic Force Between Two Parallel Conductors 842

 

 

 

Optional

 

30.7 The Magnetic Field of the Earth 855

 

 

 

Optional

 

32.4 Mutual Inductance 906

 

 

 

Optional

 

33.5 The RLC Series Circuit 932

 

 

 

Optional

 

33.6 Power in an AC Circuit 935

 

 

 

Optional

 

33.7 Resonance in a Series RLC Circuit 937

 

 

 

Optional

 

33.8 The Transformer and Power Transmission 939

 

 

 

Optional

 

33.9 Rectifiers and Filters 942

 

 

 

Optional

 

34.6 Production of Electromagnetic Waves by an Antenna 965

 

 

 

Skip

 

25.7 The Millikan Oil-Drop Experiment 709

 

 

 

Skip

 

26.7 An Atomic Description of Dielectrics 740

 

 

 

Skip

 

27.5 Superconductors 762

 

 

 

Skip

 

29.6 The Hall Effect 825

 

 

 

Skip

 

31.6 Eddy Currents 884

 

 

 

Skip

 

34.4 Energy Carried by Electromagnetic Waves 961

 

 

 

Skip

 

34.5 Momentum and Radiation Pressure 963